Collecting feedback and improving user experience

We described back in June how we were testing and using feedback to inform the content on the site in its beta stage.

This has continued post launch. We’ve been gathering comments from customer service staff, services and website users. Nottinghamshire.gov.uk features a short survey (only four questions) asking users what they came to the site to do and whether they found what they’re looking for.

Despite our careful proofing before publishing pages, this feedback has highlighted some ‘quick fixes’ such as spelling errors and broken links, as well as more substantial suggestions on the site design and navigation. We’re logging all comments on Trello, assigning them to team members to action and archiving them when complete.

We’ve also been using HotJar – a (paid-for) tool that measures user behaviour – to monitor how the pages are being used. From the heat maps it provides, we can see the most popular areas of a page and how users are scrolling and clicking through the site.

Hotjar screenshot

One example of how I’ve used this information is on the Rufford Abbey and Sherwood Forest Country Parks pages, where I could see that viewing the car parking charges was a hot area of activity. Although they were in a prominent position on the page, the information was only available as a PDF download. When I needed to create a new page for the parks’ festive opening hours, this gave me an opportunity to improve this content and create calendar views for car parking charges.

I’ve also been using the HotJar recordings to see how users are using our what’s on/events listings. Being able to see how users on different devices and browsers are navigating this section of the site has allowed our team to make improvements, such as reducing the default number of events shown when browsing on mobile to reduce the scrolling length.

These HotJar tools do have limitations; you can’t interact with the user or ask any follow up questions as you can when user testing in person. However, there’s also less chance that you will influence their behaviour. For our team, it has been an effective method to gather a significant amount of data about users’ actions and opinions of the website, which we are using to improve the overall user experience.

Posted by Lucy Pickering, Digital Content Officer

Digital Champions

As Member Digital Champion, I know the amount of hard work that the digital team and colleagues from ICT and customer teams have put in to reach the goal of having one of the best websites in local government.

That is why it is particularly pleasing for Nottinghamshire to be honoured for a string of well-deserved national awards.

We won Digital Team of the Year in the UK Digital Experience Awards and an Excellence in User Experience win in the 2015 UXUK Awards – both of these were for the website development. In the UXUK Awards our new site was praised for being “exceptional” and a “benchmark for local government”.

Also, I am particularly pleased that our digital team leader, Sarah Lay, has won the Lifetime Achievement Award in the  Comms2point0 Unawards. I have to say she seems far too young to be picking up a lifetime achievement award! But, seriously, well done Sarah and well deserved!

We have also been shortlisted for Digital Council of the Year in the prestigious LGC Awards 2016.

While I it would be easy to see this as the end of the journey, I think we are at the start. Martin Done, our communication director who has overseen this digital transformation, is now looking how to take it to the next level which is really exciting and encouraging.

So watch this space!

Councillor Darren Langton
Member Digital Champion

What are words worth?

Those of a certain age may recall the song ‘Wordy Rappinghood’ by American new wave band Tom Tom Club. Although I’ve defined Tom Tom Club as new wave, the track itself was less genre specific, challenging the perceptions of its early ’80’s audience with a heavy rap and funky disco influence.

Lyrically it also presents a challenge, especially if you overlook the rhyme and dexterity of Tina Weymouth’s vocal and actually begin to think about what she’s saying:
“What are words worth?” is the oft-repeated refrain. As a line in a song it’s easily overlooked but taken in context with the rest of the lyric and given some real thought you’re left thinking, well, what are words worth? What are words really worth?

It’s a question we in the digital team at Nottinghamshire County Council are continually asking ourselves as we develop content in the new website and it’s a thought process that, as I found the other day, can get the grey cells ticking over at the most unexpected of times.

Out for a lunchtime walk in the sunshine, I passed a cake shop (yes, colleagues, you read that right, I passed a cake shop!) with a small notice pinned in the window ‘Back in 30 minutes. Out on a delivery.’

My immediate thought was that the two sentences were the wrong way round. In my head the natural order began with the ‘where’ rather than the ‘when.’ But my digitised self then took over and quickly rationalised the thought process. What is it that the consumer (user) wants to know? The shop is closed, so what is most important to them? Is it the fact that the owner is out on a delivery, or is it the knowledge that the shop will be open again in 30 minutes?

Leaving aside for the moment the fact that the proprietor’s efforts to be helpful where immediately undone by the lack of an indicated start time to the 30 minute timeframe, the realisation was that the wording on the note, or in this case, more specifically, the order of the wording, was correct. Had I been visiting the shop, I would have wanted to know when it was reopening. I didn’t really care why it was closed. So, the order was right, but the ‘Missing words’ (“It just don’t make sense, the way you did the things you did” – there I go again, showing my age with musical references from my childhood) meant that unfortunately the shop ultimately failed its user test.

And it’s that way of thinking we’re continually engaged in as we review and rewrite content. We’re questioning each and every word, the way in which the words are phrased, the order in which they’re written, what’s needed and what’s not, all with the ultimate aim of enhancing the user experience and making the site as easy to use as possible. Is there a value to using the word? Is it the right word? Does including it make the overall content easier to understand?

“Hurried words, sensible words, words that tell the truth, cursed words, lying words, words that are missing the fruit of the mind”, sings Ms Weymouth (in French – more creativity in word usage!) as the song continues to provide the English semantics students amongst us with much to ponder.

Our aim at Nottinghamshire County Council is to build a website which provides that fruit and feeds the mind, leaving the user with a nutritional experience. That, to us, is what words are worth.

Posted by Andy Lowe, Senior Digital Officer.

Personas – representing our customers

Sample persona - Beryl CumberlandWe’ve added a new tool to our user-centered design toolkit in the last couple of weeks: personas.

Personas offer a way to realistically represent our key customer groups online and can be used to help make informed decisions on design.

They’re a good way of keeping the customer and their needs in mind as we build our digital services, although they don’t replace contact with real people to research and test what we build.

We developed our set as part of the work we did with The Insight Lab (read their post for us on open card-sorting here) and represent the major primary, secondary and tertiary groups across nottinghamshire.gov.uk as a whole.

In order to develop them we used data about current usage, contact through other channels and experience from service areas. Through a workshop we got relevant colleagues together and created a huge set of potential personas before distilling these down to a smaller set by combining characteristics and looking for shared needs or themes.

There’s some great background reading about personas and how to create them on Usability.gov.

While a small set for the site overall is useful we may develop additional personas as we build our digital services.

You can see and download an example from our persona set here (PDF).

Posted by Sarah Lay, Senior Digital Officer