Collecting feedback and improving user experience

We described back in June how we were testing and using feedback to inform the content on the site in its beta stage.

This has continued post launch. We’ve been gathering comments from customer service staff, services and website users. Nottinghamshire.gov.uk features a short survey (only four questions) asking users what they came to the site to do and whether they found what they’re looking for.

Despite our careful proofing before publishing pages, this feedback has highlighted some ‘quick fixes’ such as spelling errors and broken links, as well as more substantial suggestions on the site design and navigation. We’re logging all comments on Trello, assigning them to team members to action and archiving them when complete.

We’ve also been using HotJar – a (paid-for) tool that measures user behaviour – to monitor how the pages are being used. From the heat maps it provides, we can see the most popular areas of a page and how users are scrolling and clicking through the site.

Hotjar screenshot

One example of how I’ve used this information is on the Rufford Abbey and Sherwood Forest Country Parks pages, where I could see that viewing the car parking charges was a hot area of activity. Although they were in a prominent position on the page, the information was only available as a PDF download. When I needed to create a new page for the parks’ festive opening hours, this gave me an opportunity to improve this content and create calendar views for car parking charges.

I’ve also been using the HotJar recordings to see how users are using our what’s on/events listings. Being able to see how users on different devices and browsers are navigating this section of the site has allowed our team to make improvements, such as reducing the default number of events shown when browsing on mobile to reduce the scrolling length.

These HotJar tools do have limitations; you can’t interact with the user or ask any follow up questions as you can when user testing in person. However, there’s also less chance that you will influence their behaviour. For our team, it has been an effective method to gather a significant amount of data about users’ actions and opinions of the website, which we are using to improve the overall user experience.

Posted by Lucy Pickering, Digital Content Officer

A problem with behaviour OR Usability informing your content

Post-It notes on piece of paperWe blogged back in April about our work in usability testing which helped to shape the design of our beta site that you can see here: beta.nottinghamshire.gov.uk.

Our testing hasn’t stopped. We’re collecting user feedback which we’re implementing into future iterations of the site. The site is being developed for the people of Nottinghamshire and this blog post shows how their views are shaping the site in terms of usability and testing. Sometimes we think we know the correct label due to gut feeling. However, as we found out recently, you can’t beat a bit of good old fashioned consensus and testing.

As a Senior Digital Officer at the Council (and having worked across many different websites) I tend to think that I know what people want or expect to find behind a link, a button or a title on a page.

We were working on the Adoption content and were looking at what you might title the page on the process of adoption. ‘Adoption Process was my first instinct. Next I asked my peers what they thought it should be – and from there we formed a clear opinion of what it should be titled. This, however, is not the ending.

We have a clear process for these things within the Digital First team and that is why we always test assumptions. Sometimes assumptions on how people will navigate a site can be right, but it is often valuable to remove yourself from the process and find out what real users think. The website is after all being built for the people of Nottingham and not just the Council.

We decided to test out our assumption about the page title through a simple process, but one that was invaluable and has informed some of our user testing and decision making on additional elements of the website content.

We simply wrote down three choices on a post it note and sat in an area of the Council with high footfall. Post it notes in hand, I asked people under which heading they would expect to find out about the process of adopting. The three choices were:

  • Steps to adoption
  • How to adopt
  • I want to adopt.

Sitting there, I thought I knew that everyone would choose the right one in ‘How to adopt’ which of course is the best heading for this type of content. Wrong!

Out of all the people surveyed, they picked the heading that I thought no-one would choose which was ‘I want to adopt’. Not only this, but they also gave informed reasons without prompting as to why they would choose this heading to find the information provided. The distilling of this feedback was down to people having considered all of the information prior to adoption and now they want to physically go through the process of adoption and would expect to find the information on what to do next within this area.

Additionally, and most interestingly, one of the people I surveyed had previous experience of our adoption process having already adopted a child in Nottinghamshire (I didn’t know this until after I had surveyed them) and they chose the header of ‘I want to adopt’ also.

It just goes to show that you can sometimes rely too heavily on your opinion and experience, but it’s the people who use these tools that can surprise you with the answers they give and how they use the tools you’ve provided them.

Posted by Paul Roper, Senior Digital Officer

Moving to beta

Screenshot of beta website homepageOur work to move to a new nottinghamshire.gov.uk is at an exciting stage – we’re going into public beta.

We’ve been working on understanding user and organisational needs, and whether the content we have on the current site meets these. And we’ve been prototyping and testing (interaction and visual) design. Behind all this we’ve been learning to live our Digital First principles and ethos and preparing the technology we need to move the site forward.

Moving to public beta means we’re now ready to share this work – still at an early stage – more widely so we can begin to gather feedback and iterate as we continue with the build over the next few months.

What do we mean by beta?

We’ve defined what we mean when we say beta along the lines of the Government Digital Service definition. We’re using it to mean: “a web page, service or site is still in a testing phase and is a developing prototype going through testing and rapid iterations.”

The beta we’re putting public now is still very much a prototype and we’ll be aiming to, in the words of the Government Digital Service,  “build a fully working prototype which you test with users. (…) continuously improve on the prototype until it’s ready to go live, replacing or integrating with any existing services.” In our case this means preparing content and improved (appropriate) transactional capability across the Council’s 500 services.

Our beta is very small right now – the start of a structure, a few areas of content, little integration with other systems – but we’ll be building on this over the next couple of months. It will run in parallel with our current website (this remains the official digital channel of the Council for now) as we transition services over during the summer ahead of a full go live with the new site in September.

Why make it public?

Both our digital design philosophy and principles describe how we want to work openly and with our customers.

Putting the beta live now may well show up things that don’t work or could work better – and that’s great! We’d rather know about that stuff and work on it more before the beta transitions to be the official website of the Council.

How long did it take?

We moved into private alpha at the start of the year after implementing Umbraco and completing initial work on our content inventory.

Much of the work on beta has happened in a couple of sprints over the last month. The first covered the usability testing on the three design concepts and analysing the results while the second covered a fast build based on what we learnt.

Last week we went into private beta, sharing the site with stakeholders and Council staff.

The site will remain in public beta until September when it becomes the official Council website.

What’s different from the current site?

Lots!

The beta site is responsive and optimised for use on different devices. We’ve thought not only about how the site displays and the priority of content on devices but also about user behaviour on these devices (touch navigation, for example) and the context of visits.

Our design prototype testing explored what sort of information architecture works best for our customers and we’re building a mixed navigation of both container and tagged content (hat tip to GOV.UK here for inspiration on designing this interaction).

We’ve kept the ‘top tasks’ style prioritisation on the homepage but in order to move people more quickly to the right content and this will work dynamically in time to reflect activity on the site at a given time. But recognising that most of our visitors come straight to a deeper content page from an external search engine we’ve designed a path through the hierarchy that makes the least stops on the way to where people need to be, while still signposting clearly. You can check this out through the ‘browse this website’ tab on the tasks box on the beta homepage.

We’ve prioritised the customer need on each of the page by getting site furniture out of the way as much as possible and making content as focused as possible by telling people what they want to know as clearly and concisely as we can (still lots of work to do on content though!).

But we’ve also recognised there is organisation needs to be met, and that the Council isn’t only a service provider but a part of the local community. This means we’re trying out a chunky footer on each page that brings in news, events and social content. Common ‘homepage’ features that people don’t see when they land deeper in the site by using ‘Google as the homepage’. We need to explore this idea further to see if the chunky footer works for user and organisation but we’d like this to be contextual in the future – so the news, events, social and democratic content you see is directly related to the service content above.

These are just a few of the changes we’ve made so far but there’s lots more to come. We’re all really excited to learn more about how people use the site and what works (and what doesn’t)!

What happens next?

We’re encouraging people to try out the beta and provide feedback. To help with this we’re using Google Analytics but also Hotjar – capturing mouse patters and generating heatmaps as well as gathering qualitative data through a short survey. The survey appears shortly after you land on our site or you can find it here.

We’ll be taking what we learn from this and over the next few months we’ll be transitioning from the current site to the beta being the official channel so we’ll be signposting from one to the other in preparation for that. We’ll also be continuing to work with customers, services and our other access channels as part of this work.

There is a lot more work to do to add in functionality that will allow the site to work in the ways our customers expect, integrate with our transactional services and get the content to the standard we’re looking for.

We don’t expect the new nottinghamshire.gov.uk will look exactly like our beta does currently when it goes live in September – visual design, interaction design and content will all change over the summer with more work by the team based on evidence of usage patterns and usability testing.

For now – we’re just asking you to give it a go and we looking forward to hearing what you think!

Some things to try on the beta:

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Sign up for the latest updates on our Digital First progress through emailme.

Posted by Sarah Lay, Senior Digital Officer (Digital Team Leader)

Personas – representing our customers

Sample persona - Beryl CumberlandWe’ve added a new tool to our user-centered design toolkit in the last couple of weeks: personas.

Personas offer a way to realistically represent our key customer groups online and can be used to help make informed decisions on design.

They’re a good way of keeping the customer and their needs in mind as we build our digital services, although they don’t replace contact with real people to research and test what we build.

We developed our set as part of the work we did with The Insight Lab (read their post for us on open card-sorting here) and represent the major primary, secondary and tertiary groups across nottinghamshire.gov.uk as a whole.

In order to develop them we used data about current usage, contact through other channels and experience from service areas. Through a workshop we got relevant colleagues together and created a huge set of potential personas before distilling these down to a smaller set by combining characteristics and looking for shared needs or themes.

There’s some great background reading about personas and how to create them on Usability.gov.

While a small set for the site overall is useful we may develop additional personas as we build our digital services.

You can see and download an example from our persona set here (PDF).

Posted by Sarah Lay, Senior Digital Officer

It all starts with discovery – getting going on our intranet work

We’re now in the discovery phase for our intranet and employee engagement workstream. We’ve already completed content inventory work on our current intranet (read more about the inventory we did on our public website here) and to help us with other parts of the discovery phase we’re working with an external expert, Ann Kempster.

Ann has previously worked at the Cabinet Office and other parts of central government as well as on a number of digital projects elsewhere.

Here Ann describes how she’s approaching the discovery work and the activities we’re undertaking.

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One of the work streams for Digital First includes a review of internal digital communications channels, including the intranet. That’s what I’m working on over the next few weeks.

Previously I’ve managed intranets at the Cabinet Office and I’ve also worked on delivering intranets in number of other central government departments, including the Department of Health, Defra and Communities and Local Government.

I’m really excited to be working on this project with a council that is bought into the process of digital transformation. Nottinghamshire County Council is at a very interesting point in its journey with a new Chief Executive shortly to come into post and the support for the Digital First project at all levels, from the elected council members to staff at the council.

What I’m trying to find out

Is the intranet working for users?
Does it help staff do their jobs?

Is there space for engagement between senior leadership and frontline staff?
Is there space for staff to talk to each other?

Are staff getting the right information?
Are they getting information in a format that helps them?

What about frontline staff who don’t have regular access to the intranet? How does Nottinghamshire County Council make sure they are included and receive the right information?

How am I doing this?

I’m spending a lot of my time talking to as many members of staff as I can – both through one-to-one interviews and group workshops. I’m looking for what is working well, what isn’t working so well; what tools and processes people need to do their jobs. I’m also looking for any potential blockers, things that might stop a new intranet being used.

A few themes are already starting to emerge in my early round of interviews with key internal stakeholders and I’m keen to see if these themes are backed up in the workshops being run this week.

In the workshops with frontline staff and managers, we’ll be doing some activities and exercises to look at positives and negatives of the current system and what might help them do their jobs better or easier in the future.

I’ve also been talking to other people in the public sector who are doing good work on intranets, as well as experts in the private sector to see what trends are predicted for intranets.

Then what?

All of this information – nearly 20 one-to-one interviews and workshop outputs from almost 40 frontline staff – will be analysed with the help of hundreds of Post-It notes to see where clusters and themes emerge.

These will then be synthesised into a report that will be delivered to the Council for consideration, along with findings from my chats with intranet experts. I’ll be proposing a set of recommendations and a series of objectives, time scales and metrics for success.

I will also share some of the finds, key themes and ideas in another blog post here.

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Ann is a freelance digital projects manager and you can find her on Twitter.

If you’re interested in getting involved in testing or giving feedback on the new Nottinghamshire.gov.uk, the Council’s public website, then get in touch.

Card sorting: working out how to navigate our services online

Card sortingOne of the challenges we’re tackling as we build a new user-centred nottinghamshire.gov.uk is how to organise access to, and information about, our services.

We’re doing research on how people find their way to our website, if or how they move around it once they’re there, and how we can make our navigation intuitive to support their behaviour. We’ve delved into taxonomies and are investigating both on-site and external search. We’ve used data, analytics and undertaken user research too.

One of the activities we’ve carried out as part of this discovery is holding open card-sorting workshops with a range of our users. We contracted The Insight Lab to carry out this work with us and below their Head of Research, Dr Emily Webber, reveals the why, what and how of card sort workshops.

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When The Insight Lab first connected with Nottinghamshire County Council, they were looking for a user experience consultancy to run a series of card-sorting workshops, to help inform the re-development of the content structure of nottinghamshire.gov.uk, as part of their Digital First project.

Card-sorting is a simple but incredibly effective way of obtaining valuable insight into the ways in which different types of users’ group information and content in order to inform the design of information architecture (IA) where information is structured intuitively, meaning that users can quickly and easily find what they are looking for.

cards on tableThere are a variety of card sorting techniques which can be used for this purpose, but for this project, we decided on open card-sort approach. This requires users to sort cards containing website content into groups that make sense to them, and give each group a title that summarises the cards that sit within it. Findings from this process then feed into further research and validation methods, and form a great foundation of evidence for a user-centred site structure, which meets the expectations of those using it.

We were really excited to take on this project particularly due to some of the unique challenges that it presented, such as the diverse range of users that the website must cater for, and the large and varied amounts of content to be presented. Participants for the workshops were therefore recruited from across the county (we ran workshops across Nottinghamshire from Worksop to West Bridgford) and came from a range of backgrounds and levels of computer experience. Content for the card sort was carefully selected to reflect the varied types of information and plethora of services available.

Following an audit of current content and consideration of existing documentation, such as priorities and key user journeys, 61 cards formed the basis of the card sort. During the workshop, each participant first sorted these cards (which had a title printed on one side, and a description of the content of the other) into groups that made sense to them, and then gave each group a heading using a Post-It note. For example, a participant may have grouped cards such as ‘Studying’ and ‘Apply for a School Place’ under a heading which they titled ‘Education’ or ‘Schools’.

Participants were also encouraged to indicate any sub-groupings, as well as any cards they felt fell into more than one category (more Post-Its!),– for example ‘Report a Pothole’ may have been grouped under a transport heading, but then also linked to a ‘Report a problem’ group.

Although this data alone provides valuable insight into a user-focused IA, we wanted to provide further support for the findings using rich, in-depth feedback from participants. Following the individual card sorts, participants were therefore led in an open discussion, exploring points such as what they had found particularly difficult or easy to sort, cards which they felt were missing and issues with labeling and understanding, for example.

Card layoutResults from the card sort were then supplemented with points arising from the post-sort discussion to provide rich insight and outline actionable recommendations for the creation of a user-focused site IA.

The card-sorting workshops have proved an invaluable exercise in gaining insight into how Nottinghamshire residents perceive Council services, and how they understand and group content. The results will provide an excellent base for future work into the re-development of the Council website and its underlying information architecture.

Research methods including closed-card sorts and tree testing could be used to provide additional insight to support and extend the findings of these initial workshops, with results from all sources then feeding into a new user-focused Council website, where visitors can quickly and easily find the information they are looking for.

Dr Emily Webber is Head of Research at The Insight Lab, an expert-led consultancy, implementing user-focused research methods to drive the design of digital products and services that are simple, efficient and a pleasure to use. Find out more about them on their website.

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We’re looking at what our next step is now to design a clear information architecture for our website and we’ll update you on this as we do it!

Thanks to all who took part in the workshops. If you’d like to get involved with testing as part of our Digital First work then you can find out more here.